EZ Math Movie, Language, Graphics


Graphics

clearGraph()

This command completely erases the graph's drawing surface, including the grid, axes, and origin. By default, this command will leave you with a completely white drawing surface. Use it this way:

clearGraph();

drawAxes()

This command draws the x-axis and the y-axis. It is often called after drawGrid and before drawOrigin. Here is how to use it:

drawAxes();

The separate axes are drawn with the colors held in the variables xAxisColor and yAxisColor. These default to 'red' and 'green' respectively. The axes thickness defaults to 3, and this value is kept in the variable axisThickness.

After drawAxes executes, the line color is set to yAxisColor (default: 'green') and the line thickness is set to axisThickness (default: 3). You will probably want to change this situation using setLineColor and setLineThickness before you subsequently draw.

See: drawGrid(), drawOrigin(), setLineColor('color'), setLineThickness(n)

drawGrid()

This command draws a grid of lines on the (x, y) plane like the type of grid found on common graph paper. Here is how to use it:

drawGrid();

After drawGrid executes, the line color is set to gridColor (default: a light gray) and the line thickness is set to gridThickness (default: 1). You will probably want to change these using setLineColor and setLineThickness for your subsequent drawings.

See: drawAxes(), drawOrigin(), setLineColor('color'), setLineThickness(n)

drawLineSegment(x1, y1, x2, y2)

This command draws a line segment between the endpoints given in the parameters. The (x, y) coordinates for one endpoint are given by the parameters x1 and y1. The parameters x2 and y2 are the (x, y) coordinates for the other endpoint.

The line is drawn with the current line color and thickness. Here is an example of how to use it:

drawLineSegment(2, 3, 4, 5);

The above code would draw a line segment from point (2, 3) to point (4, 5).

Tutorial: Drawing a line segment

See: setLineThickness(n), setLineColor('color')

drawOrigin()

This command draws a small square at the point (0, 0), the origin of the (x, y) graph. Here is how it is used:

drawOrigin();

After drawOrigin executes, the line color is set to originLineColor (default: 'black'), the area color is set to originAreaColor (default: 'white'), and the line thickness is set to originLineThickness (default: 1). You will probably want to change these using setLineColor, setAreaColor, and setLineThickness for your subsequent drawings.

See: drawAxes(),, drawGrid(), setLineColor('color'), setAreaColor('color'), setLineThickness(n)

drawPoint(x, y)

This command plots a point at the x- and y-coordinates given by the parameters x and y, respectively. Here's how to use it:

point(6, 4);

The above code would plot a point at (6, 4).

Tutorial: Drawing a point

drawRectangleArea(x, y, width, height)

This command draws a rectangle filled with the current area color. The parameters x and y give the x- and y-coordinates, respectively, for the upper left corner of the rectangle. The parameters width and height set the width and height, respectively, of the rectangle.

Here is an example of how to use this command:

drawRectangleArea(3, 5, 6, 4);

The above code would place a filled rectangle with its upper left corner at point (3, 5). The rectangle would have a width of 6 and a height of 4.

Tutorial: Drawing a rectangle

See: drawRectangleLine(x, y, width, height), setAreaColor('color')

drawRectangleLine(x, y, width, height)

This command draws the perimeter of a rectangle filled with the current line color and thickness. The parameters x and y give the x- and y-coordinates, respectively, for the upper left corner of the rectangle. The parameters width and height set the width and height, respectively, of the rectangle.

Here is an example:

drawRectangleLine(2, 4, 5, 3);

The above code would place an outline of a rectangle with its upper left corner at point (2, 4). The rectangle would have a width of 5 and a height of 3.

Tutorial: Drawing a rectangle

See: drawRectangleArea(x, y, width, height), setLineColor('color')

rectangleClear(x, y, width, height)

This command erases all drawing, including grid, axes, and origin, within the rectangle defined by its parameters. The parameters x and y give the x- and y-coordinates, respectively, for the upper left corner of the rectangle. The parameters width and height set the width and height, respectively, of the rectangle. This is an example of its use:

rectangleClear(2, 3, 7, 6);

The above code would erase all graphics within a rectangle 7 units wide and 6 units high. The rectangle would be located with its upper left corner at (2, 3).

setAreaColor('color')

This command sets the color to be used for any area drawing command, such as drawRectangleArea. The color parameter should equal any color value listed in the color values section. Here's its use:

sesetAreaColor('red');

The above code would cause all following area drawing commands, such as drawRectangleArea, to be filled with the color red.

See: setLineColor('color'), Language, Colors

setBounds(xMin, xMax, yMin, yMax)

This This commands sets the bounds for the (x, y) graph. The parameters work this way:

Usually, the graph bounds are set using the drop down list of options available on the graph panel. However, they can be also set to any valid values under program control using this command. Here is an example of its use:

setBounds(-5, -5, 5, 5);

When setting bounds with setBounds, drawGrid will probably not provide convenient markings for your graph. The commands drawAxes and drawOrigin will work fine, though.

setLineColor('color')

This command sets the color to be used for any line drawing command, such as drawLineSegment. The color parameter should equal any color value listed in the color values section. Here is how to use this command:

setLineColor('blue');

See: setAreaColor('color'), Language, Colors

setLineJoin('type')

This command sets the appearance of the spot where line segment endpoints meet. Values for the parameter type can be 'round', 'bevel', or 'miter'. This is how to use setLineJoin:

setLineJoin('round');

setLineCap('type')

This command sets the appearance of the endpoints for a line segment. Values for the parameter type can be 'butt', 'round', or 'square'. Using this command looks like this:

setLineCap('round');

setLineThickness(thickness)

This command sets the thickness of a line segment. The parameter thickness is a numeric value representing the pixel thickness of the line segment. Here is how to use this command:

setLineThickness(5);

Tutorial: forward and back

setupGraph()

This command is actually a way to call several common graphic commands all at once. Basically, setupGraph does all of this:

clearGraph();
drawGrid();
drawAxes();
drawOrigin();

setAreaColor('yellow');

setLineThickness(2);
setLineColor('black');

As it turns out, setupGraph is often a very convenient way to get things ready for most investigations. Its use is:

setupGraph();

The examples and tutorials often use setupGraph to prepare the drawing surface.

Graphics - Turtle

back(distance)

This command moves the turtle backwards through a distance given by the parameter distance. If the pen is down, then a line will be drawn over this distance. Example:

back(4);

The above code would move the turtle backward 4 units.

This command does not change the turtle's heading. It does not turn the turtle around. The turtle moves like a car in reverse.

Tutorial: forward and back

See: forward(distance)

forward(distance)

This command moves the turtle forward through a distance given by the parameter distance. If the pen is down, then a line will be drawn over this distance. Example:

forward(3);

The above code moves the turtle in a straight line through a distance of 3 units.

Tutorial: forward and back

See: back(distance)

left(angle)

This command turns the turtle to the left through an angle given by the parameter angle. By default, the angle is measured in degrees. If you want to work in radians, use the command setRadians. An example:

left(20);

By default, the above code would spin the turtle 20 degrees toward its left.

The turtle stays in place while turning. If you give left a negative angle, then the turtle will turn right.

Tutorial: right and left

See: right(angle), setRadians(), setDegrees()

penDown()

This command drops the turtle's imaginary pen onto the drawing surface and causes the turtle to draw a line along its path as it moves. By default, the pen is down. This command is used this way:

penDown();

Tutorial: penUp and penDown

See: penUp()

penUp()

This command lifts the turtle's imaginary pen off of the drawing surface; so, the turtle will not draw as it moves. Here's how to use this command:

penUp();

Tutorial: penUp and penDown

See: penDown()

right(angle)

This command turns the turtle to the right through an angle given by the parameter angle. Use it like this:

right(40);

By default, the above code would spin the turtle 40 degrees toward its right.

The turtle stays in place while turning. If you give right a negative angle, then the turtle will turn left.

Tutorial: right and left

See: left(angle), setRadians(), setDegrees()

setH(angle)

This command sets the turtle's heading to an angle given by the parameter angle. This angle is in standard position relative to the graph's axes.

The turtle stays in place while turning. Here is an example of using this command:

setH(30);

Assuming the angle measurement is set to its default, the above code would aim the turtle 30 degrees up from the horizontal.

Tutorial: setH

See: setRadians(), setDegrees()

setX(x)

This command changes only the x-coordinate for the turtle. That is, it moves the turtle left or right, but not up or down. The new x-coordinate is given by the parameter x. If the pen is down, the turtle will draw a line segment as it moves to its new x-coordinate. Here is an example of this command:

setX(5);

If the turtle was at point (2, 3), it would move to point (5, 3). The x-coordinate would change; the y-coordinate would not change.

Tutorial: setX, setY, and setXY

See: setY(y), setXY(x, y)

setXY(x, y)

This command changes both the x-coordinate and y-coordinate for the turtle. The new x- and y-coordinates are given by the parameters x and y respectively.  If the pen is down, the turtle will draw a line segment as it moves to its new x-and y-coordinates. Here is an example of this command:

setXY(5, 7);

If the turtle was at point (2, 3), it would move to point (5, 7). Both the x-and y-coordinates would change.

Tutorial: setX, setY, and setXY

See: setX(x), setY(y)

setY(y)

This command changes only the y-coordinate for the turtle. That is, it moves the turtle up or down, but not right or left. The new y-coordinate is given by the parameter y. If the pen is down, the turtle will draw a line segment as it moves to its new y-coordinate. Here is how to use this command:

setY(7);

If the turtle was at point (2, 3), it would move to point (2, 7). The y-coordinate would change; the x-coordinate would not change.

Tutorial: setX, setY, and setXY

See: setX(x), setXY(x, y)


All contents of EZ Math Movie are copyrighted: Copyright 2011, Edward A. Zobel. All rights reserved.



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